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Children Have a Right to be Educated?

In 1852, Massachusetts rallied the troops for a headlong charge down the compulsory education path. Since that time, America has been functioning on the basis that every child has a right to an education. One hundred fifty years downstream, we must ask ourselves where “education as a child’s right” has taken us. This 27-year veteran and many other public-school teachers… READ MORE

Transforming Squabbles

In the last several weeks I have heard myself repeatedly telling my students about my growing conviction that recess is a very important part of the day.  It truly is. Active playtime is consistent with how God created our bodies. It also offers regular and precious opportunities to mentor relationships as we discuss how sportsmanship.  Because respecting others and apologizing… READ MORE

Using Maps and Genealogies to Understand the Bible’s Story Line

Lucinda J Miller | Blog, Elementary Teacher’s Blog

I still remember reciting the seven continents with my fellow small-bodied second graders, remember the exact rhythm and tone of our voices rising in unison: “Asia. Africa. North America. South America. Antarctica. Europe. Australia!” My teacher sometimes had us do map drills, where we’d stand in front of the big wall map—fascinating for all its strange shapes and strange words—and… READ MORE

Spot Checks, Hooks, and Sweet Rewards: Ideas for Elementary Math

Recently as I recounted several math ideas I find beneficial in the classroom, I thought perhaps sharing them could inspire another teacher.  After all, don’t we regularly beg, borrow, and steal ideas? I imagine that you too rarely swallow another teacher’s idea whole; almost invariably it requires at least a bit of chewing to fit both you as the teacher… READ MORE

Lessons from Little People

Caleb handed me a tiny scrap as he walked past. I wondered why he was giving me this trash. He muttered, “Look inside.” I unfolded it to find a note he had written, “I luve you.” Not trash after all, but a treasure!Today I received an interesting gift...

2018 Survey Results: Useful Tools

Lucas Hilty | Blog, Recommended Resources

In this post, we continue digesting the input from the 85 Anabaptist educators who filled out our survey. For Part 1 of the results, which includes demographic profiles of respondents and the types of curricula and resources their schools make available, go here. How valuable are these tools to you? We asked respondents to rate the value of a number… READ MORE

Living Truths

For a number of years, I used the Character Sketch books as a basis for our devotional time at school.  Each month, we focused on a specific character quality. Throughout the month, we learned interesting facts about animals that display that quality while we also memorized Scripture, poetry or songs to go with the quality.  I sought diligently and unwaveringly… READ MORE

What Do I See?

“It seems like no one cares about me!  No one wants to play with me.”  This was the perception Brenda shared.  I assured her that we do care about her, and tried to gently help her to see that if she is being mean to other children they are timid about playing with her. What do I see when I… READ MORE

2018 Survey Results: Identifying the Educators

For three weeks in November, we asked conservative Anabaptist educators to tell us about their work at school. In this post, we begin sharing the results. As you read, remember: this survey was conducted online and does not represent a scientific sampling of educators in the conservative Anabaptist community. The results should not be taken as accurate representations of the… READ MORE

Monkeys to Infinity: A Fun Way to Teach Probability

Lucinda J Miller | Blog, High School Teacher’s Blog

If you put a monkey in front of a typewriter and let him type for a very long time, would he eventually produce the works of Shakespeare? This question, or a version similar to it, has been floating around the world of mathematical probability for a very long time and is thought to have originated with Émile Borel, an early… READ MORE